Print

Brand Colors

Color is an important element of brand identity. Like the iconic red of Coca-Cola® and the unmistakable brown of UPS®, color helps your audience identify who you are at a glance.

Blue and gold are the brand colors for every University of California campus, but UCLA’s versions convey the unique and uniquely positive brand personality, such as the “hero” blue and gold colors that are synonymous with Westwood. The UCLA color palette includes primary, secondary and tertiary palettes. Correct usage of these palettes is vital to upholding the visual legacy of the UCLA brand.




  • Color Palette

    The UCLA color palette includes primary, secondary and tertiary palettes. The “hero colors” are the blues, gold and yellow in the primary and secondary palettes. Tertiary colors may include green or purple, as well as other hues.

    If you would like, you may use as few as two colors. When representing the sky, you may accent the UCLA blue with gold or yellow from the secondary and tertiary palettes.

    For undergraduate materials, use the blue and gold as hero colors in the spread, but don’t be afraid to use the tertiary palette in “highlight” ways. For university-wide communications, use one or more tertiary colors as accents to copy or photos, but not as fields of color that compete with the overall blue and gold theme.

    Primary Color
    The primary color of the UCLA brand remains unchanged. UCLA blue is our most significant visual identifier. Note that UCLA blue is a custom Pantone color; it does not have a Pantone number. To request swatches of UCLA blue on coated and uncoated stock, use the Contact form.

    Accessing the Colors

    In order to use the correct brand colors in your print publications, you’ll need to import the appropriate color swatches. The first step to obtaining these swatches is to click on the DOWNLOAD: ASE (Adobe Swatch Exchange) link at the far left.

    The next step depends on which software you’re using.

    If you’re using Photoshop:

    In your swatches palette, click on the drop-down menu button in the upper right-hand corner. When the palette menu pops up, click on “Load Swatches.” The “Load Dialog” box will appear and you can select the .ASE file you want. Once you select the .ASE file, the swatches will load directly into your swatches palette. 

    If you’re using Illustrator:

    There are several ways to import .ASE files in Illustrator. In the swatches palette, click on the library icon in the lower left-hand corner. When the palette menu pops up, click on “Other Library.” The “Load Dialog” box will appear and you can select the .ASE file you want. Once you select the .ASE file, the swatches will load into their own palette. You can either use them from that palette or drag them into your main swatches palette..

    If you’re using InDesign:

    In your swatches palette, click on the drop-down menu button in the upper right-hand corner. When the palette menu pops up, click on “Load Swatches.” The “Load Dialog” box will appear and you can select the .ASE file you want. Once you select the .ASE file, the swatches will load directly into your swatches palette.

  • Overarching Color

    When using the UCLA color palette, it is important to use the tertiary palette as a small accent to the rest of the palettes. Correct usage of color is crucial to maintaining the visual legacy of the brand. The following are things to keep in mind when using color:

    It is OK to use only two colors in a spread. If a sky is present, it can act as UCLA blue and be accented with a gold or yellow from the palette. For example, undergraduate materials should employ more of the tertiary palette because they are more vibrant. However, blue and gold should still be the hero colors on the spread. When using the UCLA color palette in university-wide materials, it is OK to use one or multiple tertiary colors.
  • Things To Avoid

    You’re not limited to blue and gold when designing your print materials, but you should be careful not to stray from the primary and secondary palettes. Otherwise, you could end up with an unappealing mish-mash of colors that don’t effectively represent your unit or UCLA.

    Other things to avoid:

    • Do not change or tint the colors.
    • Do not use red or any other colors not represented in UCLA’s primary and secondary color palettes.